History, traditions

Leonardo da Vinci's secret lab discovered

The long-time-ago forgotten studio of the famous Florentine artist of the Renaissance Leonardo Da Vinci containing ancient frescoes and a secret room for autopsy has been discovered in Florence, Italy.

The amazing discovery was made in the lady's convent of Santissima Anunziata. Centuries ago, mother superiors of the convent used to let artists rent rooms there. Scientists assume that the Florentine genius Leonardo Da Vinci had spent a considerable amount of time there. More so, according to them, Lisa Gerardini, who later became Leonardo’s model in “Mona Lisa,” could have attended the chapel.

Currently, the convent shares the territory with the Institute of military geography. Up until recently, the actual cells as well as the rest of the premises of the convent remained hidden from the public. “It is a little bit absurd to claim that we have just found a studio of one of the greatest artists in history. But this is exactly what happened,” stated Roberto Maneschalci, one of the three researchers to contribute to the miraculous find.

The frescoes on the walls have been untouched in the course of centuries. Even scientists weren’t aware of their existence. Maneschalci has demonstrated several photos of the frescoes that could have been created by Leonardo himself. One of the frescoes depicted a white silhouette of archangel Gabriel, which vividly resembled the image on Leonardo’s paintings “The Annunciation”. Maneschalci also noted that is it still unknown whether the archangel’s image had been erased or simply had never been finished. The studio walls are also covered with numerous images of birds.

Experts assume that Leonardo had an apprentice working with him in the studio. In addition, the two of them have probably used the “secret” room to conduct autopsies, to help Leonardo sketch human anatomy in tedious details, reports Reuters.  
However, some experts are still quite hesitant as to who the author of the frescoes really is.

Skeptics consider it is still too early to celebrate. One of the leading Da Vinci experts Martin Camp has doubted the version of Italian scientists regarding their discovery.