Source AP ©

Areva, Mitsubishi to make new nuclear reactors together

French nuclear manufacturer Areva SA and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. announced a joint venture Monday to make third-generation nuclear reactors aimed at markets in Asia, the United States and eastern Europe.

The 1,100-megawatt pressurized water reactor, called the ATMEA-1, would be developed, marketed, licensed and sold by the new Paris-based company, ATMEA.

The two companies have been working for nearly a year on the project, which has about EUR70 million (US$96 million) in startup capital, Mitsubishi President Kazuo Tsukuda told a news conference in Paris.

Areva CEO Anne Lauvergeon said the reactor will be "easily licensable" and ready for licensing in less than three years. Neither executive would give a market price for the new reactors.

The reactor will incorporate all safety features of so-called third-generation reactors, including protection against falling airplanes.

Comments
Russia negotiates with terrorists in Moscow
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
World War I: Remembering the fallen, and the war criminals
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
Norwegians complain of demoralised NATO soldiers
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Mikhail Gorbachev shares his thoughts on nuclear war
Russia sets S-300 systems in Syria on combat readiness
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
World War I: Remembering the fallen, and the war criminals
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance