Source Pravda.Ru

Operation To Raise Kursk Submarine Starts In 6 Hours - 7 October, 2001 - News

The operation to raise the Kursk nuclear submarine starts in 6 hours, told journalists Vice-Admiral Mikhail Motsak, the commander of the Special Task Expedition. According to Motsak, the pressure applied to lifting cables has been built up to a total of 4,000 tons. The pressure needed to raise the sunken vessel is estimated at 4,900 tons. The lifting force applied to the forebody of the submarine has already reached the norm, said Motsak. At this moment, specialists from the barge Giant-4 are busy hoisting up the cables used while attaching the lifting devices to the Kursk. Simultaneously, they are mounting roll sensors and other special gear on the hull of the submarine. This preparatory work will take 6 hours.

Comments
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
Russia negotiates with terrorists in Moscow
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
World War I: Remembering the fallen, and the war criminals
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
Norwegians complain of demoralised NATO soldiers
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
Russia sends assault ships to counter US aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean Sea
Mikhail Gorbachev shares his thoughts on nuclear war
Russia sets S-300 systems in Syria on combat readiness
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
World War I: Remembering the fallen, and the war criminals
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance