Source Pravda.Ru

Right Sector terrorists intended to attack Crimea on Victory Day

 

In the Crimea, a group of members of the "Right Sector" extremist movement was detained. The activists of the group were planning attacks in Simferopol, Yalta and Sevastopol, the Public Relations Center of the Russian FSB reported Friday. It was said that the terrorists were preparing explosions on May 9 overnight, near the Eternal Flame memorial and the monument to Lenin in Simferopol. The extremists were also going to set offices of public organization Russian Community of the Crimea and the offices of United Russia in Simferopol on 14 and 18 April 2014 .

The goal of the group was to destabilize the socio-political situation on the peninsula and put pressure on the Russian authorities to separate the Republic of Crimea from the Russian Federation.

Explosives, firearms, ammunition, firebombs, respirators, masks and nationalist paraphernalia were found and withdrawn from the detainees.

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