Source Pravda.Ru

U.S. Missile Hits Al-Jazeera office in Baghdad

The Arab TV news channel Al-Jazeera reports that a US missile hit the Al-Jazeera office in Baghdad.

According to the channel's correspondent in the Iraqi capital, "one or two US missiles" that hit the Al-Jazeera office near the Iraqi information ministry supposedly killed one reporter and wounded several more.

A wounded reporter was helped out of the office by his colleagues from Abu Dhabi satellite TV channel, United Arab Emirates. They also let Al-Jazeera have some of their channel's time to broadcast the rescue of the reporter.

The Al-Jazeera office was destroyed completely. Whether the TV equipment is safe or not can only be determined by engineers, who cannot yet reach the site because of ongoing fighting.

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