Source Pravda.Ru

List of Banned Islamic Books Compiled in Russia

A list of 95 banned books by Moslem authors has been compiled in Russia
The other day, the Coordinating council of the North Caucasus muftis, presided by Ingushetia Mufti Muhammad Albogachiyev, wrote an address to Russian President Vladimir Putin. This is a request to provide the government with “reliable information about Islam.” The leaders of the Moslem group say that “otherwise, the leadership, military structures, society will have to spend much more on security than is currently spent for the prevention of pseudo-religious extremism.”

The Russian newspaper Vremya Novostei reports that the muftis suggest an initial measure: they say it would be reasonable to demonstrate David Lynch’s The Straight Story film, which about the popular English show-man Cat Stevens. Stevens adopted Islam in 1979, but at that, he resisted its extremist manifestations.

Last week deputies of the Tatarstan State Council also addressed Russia’s leadership. At a regular session of the Tatarstan State Council, the deputies compiled an address to the leadership of Russia in connection with the RF Education Ministry’s recommendation for the introduction of Orthodox Culture into school curriculum. The Tatarstan deputies say that “study of only the Orthodox Culture won’t make for the protection and development of national cultures; moreover, this contradicts the federal law “On education,” which states that the educational policy of the government is to provide a temporal nature of education in the country.

Here is an extract from the text of the address. “If the subject of Orthodox Culture is introduced into the school curriculum as one of the basic subjects in our multi-religion and multi-national state, it may seriously destabilize society and aggravate relations between the ethnic nations.” The upbringing of children must be oriented on culture and done optionally, so that the interests of all members of the multi-religious state are taken into consideration at that. Russian Orthodox society informs that the RF Education Ministry doesn’t suppose that Orthodox culture be obligatory for all Russian schools.

At that, the Religious Moslem Department of Russia’s Sverdlovsk region is alarmed at the increasing amount of extremist literature. Mufti Khazrat of the Yekaterinburg mosque says that extremist literature is available practically at any store specializing in this type of books.

The mufti says that a list of 95 books by Moslem authors prohibited for sale and reading has been compiled in Russia. The list was officially approved of at a plenum of the Central Religious Moslem department of Russia and CIS countries in February. The list includes such authors as M. Bagauddin, M. Ashkari, H. Murad, S. Sadlyan, F. Yakan, and others. The list of banned books was officially circulated between all religious departments and mosques in the Sverdlovsk region and in Russia on the whole.

Nevertheless, several banned books were discovered in a shop near a local mosque in the city of Krasnoufimsk during a raid held by the regional religious department. Unfortunately, this is was not an isolated instance.

Mufti Khazrat says that extremist books are delivered to the Sverdlovsk region by Arab emissaries and Turkish missionaries. The mufti warns that in several years, the region may produce its own terrorists like Movsar Barayev. He called upon Moslems not to yield to the provocation and never to read banned books.

Sergey Yugov PRAVDA.Ru

Translated by Maria Gousseva

Read the original in Russian: http://society.pravda.ru/society/2002/8/26/321/3775_islam.html

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