Source Pravda.Ru

Spy planes approach borders of Russia

Foreign spy planes fly for intelligence purposes over Russian border areas least twice a day, said in an interview Russian air force central staff commander Boris Tcheltsov. He said that foreign spy planes continue flying with the same frequency as several years before, and every day two or three flights of spy planes near Russian borders are registered, most of them are in the North and North-East of Russia.

Boris Tcheltsov informed reporters that Russian fighter planes and ground air defense systems stay on alert as soon as foreign spy planes approach Russian border areas. The central staff commander said such situations of emergency usually happen 7-8 times a day.

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