Source Pravda.Ru

Mullah Omar challenges Bush and Blair

The head of the Taliban movement challenged American President George Bush and British Premier Tony Blair. The foreign Minister in the Taliban government, Vakil Mutavakil, suggested that the world leaders should fight a duel: “The Americans are launching the propaganda that Mullah Omar is hiding, so I suggest Mr. Bush and Mr. Blair should take Kalashnikov guns in their hands and come to meet Omar. He will also be holding a Kalashnikov. Then we will find out who will run.”

“Mullah Omar is forced to constantly change his location for safety reasons. But he is actively ruling the country anyway,” said the Taliban official.

Neither Britain nor the US have had any reaction to that statement from the ruling Taliban. They are not likely to have any reaction, as the offer of a duel is like a delirium. On the other hand, it is worth mentioning that the Taliban is not going to give up their positions in the information war. They are on an equal level with the US propaganda machine.

Mullah Omar’s challenge is rather a strong propaganda step to make; it is clearly aimed at the population of the Muslim countries and the citizens of Afghanistan itself. There are no doubts that Mullah Omar can shoot very well. There is no such information pertaining to Bush and Blair. Besides, the head of the Taliban is represented like a knight, ready to fight with his enemies for the well-being of his nation.

AP photo: Pakistani girls hold a mock gallows with two effigies representing President Bush, left, and British Prime Minister Tony Blair, during a demonstration in Lahore, Thursday Oct. 25, 2001

Several years ago, a prominent Indonesian businessman who now resides in Canada, insisted on meeting me in a back room of one of Jakarta's posh restaurants. An avid reader of mine, he 'had something urgent to tell me', after finding out that our paths were going to be crossing in this destroyed and hopelessly polluted Indonesian capital.

Capitalism reduced Indonesian cities to infested carcases

Several years ago, a prominent Indonesian businessman who now resides in Canada, insisted on meeting me in a back room of one of Jakarta's posh restaurants. An avid reader of mine, he 'had something urgent to tell me', after finding out that our paths were going to be crossing in this destroyed and hopelessly polluted Indonesian capital.

Capitalism reduced Indonesian cities to infested carcases