Source Pravda.Ru

American soldiers take the fight with bin Laden to Pentagon toilets

A woman resembling bin Laden’s wife has granted an interview that al Qaeda militants consider to be a signal to reorganize themselves. the Gulf News online edition reports that the news agency had an interview in Cairo and did not mention the woman’s name, only the initials “A.S.” were given. The woman looked very confident when she said that bin Laden was alive. She also talked about his recent disagreements with Mullah Omar.

It is hard to verify whether or not the woman is bin Laden’s real wife. Specialists say that a wife of bin Laden would hardly venture to grant an interview of this kind for fear of enraging the terrorist. Bin Laden only has four wives, and special services could easily determine which one had given the interview. The use of initials would be of no use then.

One more version of the event has appeared. Bin Laden is famous for his disguised messages through the mass media. The lastest interview was probably Osama’s coded address to terrorists. The Gulf News reports that terrorists consider the woman’s interview to be a signal to reorganize themselves. The online edition supposes that the interview had a directive understood by bin Laden’s followers only. It is reported that some terrorist groups have already become more active.

The USA hardly likes any suggestions that Osama bin Laden is alive. Americans have already “rolled him up," in a roll of toilet paper that is. US forces failed in catching bin Laden this cold winter in Afghanistan, and they hope to gain revenge in the safty of warm bathrooms. The New York Times reported that toilet paper with a printed portrait of bin Laden was being distributed among the Pentagon officials. Dan Filbin is a spokesman for the Pentagon. However, as no news about the capture of bin Laden is coming, Mr. Filbin has started distributing the toilet paper with an imprint of America’s key enemy. It is a really hard task to control the equal distribution. Some of the 200 rolls are taken to the offices of the US Secretary of Defense and some are taken to the United Committee of the HQ commanders. In Filbin’s words, the toilet paper with bin Laden’s portrait and inscription “Rub out terrorism” has become really popular in the toilets of US military officials.

It was Ken Fishburg’s idea to produce such toilet paper; it became a sort of product of his hatred towards the terrorist. One roll costs $6.25. Last week, the creator suggested to send the toilet paper to Pentagon military men. The idea was welcomed. However, the paper with bin Laden’s portrait is not sent to the front line in Afghanistan. This is probably because, there, the soldiers are chasing the authentic bin Laden.

Sergey Borisov PRAVDA.Ru

Translated by Maria Gousseva

Read the original in Russian: http://pravda.ru/main/2002/03/14/38222.html

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