Source Pravda.Ru

Mikhail Deliagin: Kyoto protocol discriminates against Russia

The Kyoto protocol discriminates against Russia, Mikhail Deliagin, director of the Institute for Globalization Problems, has said. As a Rosbalt correspondent reports, Mr Deliagin said Russia could not accept a protocol which allows countries to join which have no obligations themselves and yet have the right to take important decisions regarding the agreement,' he explained. 'Any project to establish a limit on pollution levels must take into account the size of each country in comparison with its levels of pollution. If this is not taken into consideration, the Kyoto protocol becomes an instrument of discriminating against countries with a large land mass. Many EU countries and Japan have authorized pollution levels which far exceed these countries' capabilities for absorbing the carbon gases. This means that the pollution these countries produce is compensated for by the countries with a better preserved environment. In this way restrictions on Russia are four times higher than those for the US and even higher compared to EU countries and Japan.'

The Kyoto protocol was signed in Japan in 1997. The agreement seeks to limit the emission of dangerous gases that are causing global warming. According to the protocol, industrially developed countries must cut the emission of carbon monoxide and five other gases by 2008-2012 by 5.2% compared to the emission levels in 1990. So far the Kyoto protocol has been signed by 180 countries. It was ratified by Ukraine on February 24.

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