Source Pravda.Ru

1% of Russians trust political parties

Half of the Russian population only trusts the president and 28% of people trust nobody. This was the result of a national survey carried out by ROMIR Monitoring. The survey showed that 14% of Russians trust the Church, 9% trust the government and the same number of people trust the army and the mass media. Just 1% of respondents said they trust political parties.

When respondents were asked how the Cabinet should be formed 46% of respondents said the current system should be kept in place while 24% claim the Cabinet should be chosen by the party which gains the most votes in the Duma elections. Meanwhile, 17% said the Cabinet should only include members of the winning party.

1500 respondents took part in the survey.

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