Source Pravda.Ru

Terrorists Had Laid Over 30 Explosives in the Theatre

The terrorists who held hostages in the Moscow theatre, laid about 30 strongest mines in the building, a spokesperson for the operative headquarters told Interfax Saturday.

In his words, two devices were especially strong: 50 kg in TNT equivalent each. What is more, each of the 18 female kamikaze had from 0.8 to 2.0 kg of plastid with detonator strapped to the bodies. Other explosives with the strength of 3-4 kg in TNT equivalent each were laid in different parts of the building, including the roof.

The spokesperson for the operative headquarters stressed that if the explosives were detonated, all hostages would die. It is supposed that victims might amount to about one thousand.

Translated by Maria Gousseva

Read the original in Russian: http://accidents.pravda.ru/accidents/2002/10/35/285/1978_terrorism.html

Related links:

Comments
Putin dislikes the idea of US army bases coming to Kuril Islands
Russia and USA fight even in space: Americans damage Soyuz deliberately
Russia and USA fight even in space: Americans damage Soyuz deliberately
USA plays to pretend a mighty dragon that can no longer breathe fire
Argentina's coast guard sinks Chinese trawler
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
USA plays to pretend a mighty dragon that can no longer breathe fire
Russia rips its economy apart with help from the West
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Brexit: The UK's misunderstanding of Democracy