Source Pravda.Ru

RAO UES head concerned about tariff strategy

RAO UES has proposed the government to formulate a tariff strategy through 2006, Anatoly Chubais, the energy holding's head, declared at an annual shareholders' meeting today. According to him, this will result in the improvement of the system of managing the holding's expenses. The government has set a 14-percent ceiling for tariffs for 2004, however this figure cannot be single for the whole country, Chubais noted. He added that state regulation of tariffs in Russia would remain until 2006. He also pointed out that the decrease in expenses in 2002 was 14.5bn rubes ($468m), which was 2.8 percent of the annual volume of sales of the holding's subsidiaries and dependent enterprises.

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