Source Pravda.Ru

Russia's debts reach 41% of GDP

The amount of Russia's state debt has reached 41% of the GDP, First Deputy Finance Minister Alexey Ulyukayev said at a round-table meeting, devoted to support for Russian exports and foreign investments in Russia. He pointed out that in the future, the Russian government would pursue a policy of gradual replacement of foreign debts with domestic debts. Thus, the amount of domestic debt liabilities in circulation has reached RUR260bn ($8.18bn). "We plan to increase it to RUR350bn ($11bn) in 2003," Ulyukayev remarked. As it was reported earlier, Russia's government debts reached 120% of the GDP in 1999. The maximum level of government debts acceptable for EU countries is 60% of the GDP.

Comments
Constantinople wants to break the spine of Orthodoxy
Russian PM threatens not to go to World Economic Forum in Davos
Russian PM threatens not to go to World Economic Forum in Davos
Russian officials celebrate 60th anti-Russian sanction
On the report of Human Rights Watch against the DPRK
Moving inexorably towards war
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
Paris Peace Forum: A First Step but watch the Lobbies
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
Russian PM threatens not to go to World Economic Forum in Davos
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Paris Peace Forum: A First Step but watch the Lobbies
Russia unveils nuclear-powered interstellar spaceship
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Mikhail Gorbachev shares his thoughts on nuclear war
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance