Source AP ©

Another man arrested for climbing The New York Times headquarters

A man scaled a portion of The New York Times' 52-story headquarters on Wednesday morning, becoming the third person to do so in a span of a few weeks, police said.

The climber made it to the 11th floor of the building in midtown Manhattan before descending to a lower floor and spending hours making cell phone calls and talking to police. He was arrested about 5:30 a.m., police said.

At one point, the climber unfurled a banner on the "T" of the Times' sign that referenced al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, the Times reported on its Web site Wednesday.

Dozens of police and firefighters responded about 1:30 a.m. after the man was first spotted climbing the building, police said. Streets were closed off and an inflatable cushion was placed in front of the main entrance of the building.

The Daily News reported on its Web site Wednesday that it had received a call from a man identifying himself as the climber who said he was a 29-year-old college dropout from Connecticut. Police did not immediately confirm those reports.

A spokeswoman for the Times, Catherine Mathis, said modifications were made to the building and additional security was added after two climbers managed to scale the building June 5. Both made it to the top and were charged with reckless endangerment, criminal trespass and disorderly conduct.

The facade of the newly constructed building, which the Times moved into only last year, is covered with slats that allowed the men to climb the tower like a ladder.

Mathis said the company was investigating how the most recent climber was able to overcome the additional obstacles.

The Trump administration is looking for a replacement for the American military contingent in the north of Syria. If the United States agrees with Saudi Arabia, the situation in the south of the country will become a lot more intense as Iran and Israel stand on the brink of war

Iran strongly determined to fight for Golan Heights

These armchair generals who come on talk shows or give their opinions as to the capabilities of various military weapons systems are doing no more than inflating their own self image and generating circulation for the news agencies

Will Americans sacrifice one of their warships to start a major war?
Comments
George W. Bush, who saw Putin's soul in 2001, says what US attitude to Russia should be like
Unexploded Western missiles in Russia's hands: Russian air defenses to get even better
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
Unexploded Western missiles in Russia's hands: Russian air defenses to get even better
Castro sued over alleged torture
It was US and UK that sank Russia's Kursk submarine
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
Castro sued over alleged torture
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
Russia accuses British special services of staging Douma chemical attack
Iran strongly determined to fight for Golan Heights
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
USA highly concerned about Russia's cold-blooded silence in response to missile attack on Syria
Iran strongly determined to fight for Golan Heights
SWIFT refuses to cut Russia off, even if Washington insists
Unexploded Western missiles in Russia's hands: Russian air defenses to get even better