Source Pravda.Ru

IAEA Worried over the Possibility of Theft of Nuclear Materials in Iraq

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is worried that terrorists may try to steal nuclear materials in Iraq for their "dirty" nuclear bombs, IAEA Senior Information Officer Melissa Fleming told journalists in Vienna on May 6.

She pointed out that the US occupation troops did not control Iraq's nuclear facilities well enough, which can result in the "leakage" of radioactive materials for the creation of bombs. On the other hand, the IAEA has no information about the actual theft of fissionable materials, she said.

The officer said IAEA Director General Mohammed El Baradei had several times called on the US authorities to allow IAEA experts to control the nuclear facilities of Iraq which number nearly a thousand. But all of his calls remained unheeded.

Melissa Fleming said there were tonnes of enriched and natural uranium at the Al-Tuwaitha facility, which can be used for the creation of "dirty" bombs.

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