Source AP ©

NASA's moon-dirt digging competitors gain nothing

NASA's Regolith Excavation Challenge invited teams to build machines for digging mock moon dirt, or regolith, in a competition held in a one-ton sandbox on Saturday.

But all the teams fell well short of the winning requirement of 330 pounds (150 kilograms) of regolith deposited in a container in 30 minutes, and no one claimed the $250,000 (185,377 EUR) purse.

An excavator built by Technology Ranch of Pismo Beach did the best, collecting just over 143 pounds (65 kilograms) in half an hour. All the other machines broke down while digging.

The other three teams were from Berkley, Michigan; Rolla, Missouri; and Rancho Palos Verdes.

The prize rolls over to next year's competition, which will be worth $750,000 (556,132 EUR).

Comments
Hillary in 2020?
Russia unveils nuclear-powered interstellar spaceship
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Hillary in 2020?
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Paris Peace Forum: A First Step but watch the Lobbies
Paris Peace Forum: A First Step but watch the Lobbies
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Norwegians complain of demoralised NATO soldiers
Mikhail Gorbachev shares his thoughts on nuclear war
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
2018: A critical lack of common sense in world governance
Russia unveils nuclear-powered interstellar spaceship
Without INF Treaty, USA can destroy Russian nuclear weapons easily
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
The difference between Polish and Ukrainian nationalism is plain to see
Capital outflow from Russia sets new records