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Bill Clinton's speeches last year brought him more than ten million dollars

Former President Bill Clinton made more than $10 million (EUR 7.5 million) in paid speeches last year, according to new filings that show he and his presidential-candidate wife have at least $10 million (EUR 7.5 million) in the bank, and may have closer to $50 million (EUR 37.5 million).

According to legally-required financial disclosure forms made public Thursday, Bill and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton hold two accounts, each valued at somewhere between $5 million (EUR 3.7 million) and $25 million (EUR 18.7 million). One is an old-fashioned bank account; the other is a blind trust.

The former president upped his speechmaking money from the previous year, garnering some $10.2 million (EUR 7.6 million) in payments, compared with about $7.5 million (EUR 5.6 million) the year before.

The Clintons had a much more pedestrian income when he ran for president in 1992. If Sen. Clinton's 2008 presidential bid is successful, they will enter the White House a very rich couple.

Six years out of power, Bill Clinton can still raise huge sums with a personal appearance. He made a staggering $450,000 (EUR 338,245) for a single September speech in London, at a Fortune Forum event, as well as $200,000 (EUR 150,330)for an April appearance in the Bahamas to speak to IBM, and another $200,000 for a New York speech to General Motors.

The former president's earnings must be reported as the spouse of a senator. Disclosure rules do not require him to reveal everything. He received an advance from Random House for an unpublished manuscript, but is only required to say that it was greater than $1,000 (EUR 751).

He also did not have to say how much he earns as a partner with Yucaipa Global Opportunities Fund, a Los Angeles-based investment firm.

The senator's own book profits are declining, years after her "Living History" became a best-seller. She reported royalties of $350,000 (EUR 263,100) for the book last year.

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