Source Pravda.Ru

Four ex-Soviet regions seek closer ties with Russia

Representatives of four ex-Soviet breakaway regions reiterated their intention Wednesday to seek international recognition and closer ties with Russia, and a Russian lawmaker said it was high time the provinces were recognized as sovereign states.

Officials and academics from Georgia's breakaway provinces of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh disputed by Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the Trans-Dniester region of Moldova met at a conference in Moscow and pledged to pursue independence efforts.

Igor Akhba, Abkhazia's envoy to Russia, said his region was determined to become independent from Georgia and seek closer ties with Russia, the AP reports.

"The people of Abkhazia have voted for an independent republic of Abkhazia, ... we are building an independent, lawful state in accordance with international law," Akhba said.

Taimuraz Kokoyev, dean of the South-Ossetian University, said his province also had similar aims and hoped one day to become part of Russia.

"The people of South Ossetia have decided their destiny long ago ... the Ossetian people will keep seeking to join Russia," Kokoyev said.

Representatives from Nagorno-Karabakh and Trans-Dniester also said they relied on Russia's help in their efforts to win international recognition.

All the regions broke away from central governments in separatist wars in the early 1990s, cultivating close ties with Russia.

Konstantin Zatulin, a lawmaker from the Kremlin-backed United Russia party, called the sovereignty of these entities a reality that should be accepted. "Fighting with reality is as complicated as peeing against the wind," Zatulin said.

Modest Kolerov, a member of the Russian presidential administration charged with regional relations, said all the ex-Soviet republics needed to ensure freedom of speech, religion and citizenship to their citizens.

"We are acting to provide these fundamental rights to our fellow countrymen in the former Soviet republics," the Interfax news agency quoted Kolerov as saying.

A year after the constitutional referendum of December 4th, 2016 that saw the victory of the NAY and the blatant defeat of the government front that had proposed the referendum, it can be said with certainty that the trauma for the defeated is now past. But there is still fear in them, not so hidden either...

Italy: Free fall

On December 10, 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, its thirty articles enshrining basic and fundamental rights guaranteeing dignity of the human person and equality for all, regardless of race, color, creed or gender. A pipe dream?

Human Rights Day: Let us hang our heads in shame
Comments
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision
USA looking for reason to see nuclear weapons in action
Why did Donald Trump recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel?
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision
Russia works on MiG-41 doomsday fighter jet
Russia works on MiG-41 doomsday fighter jet
Russia works on MiG-41 doomsday fighter jet
Mikhail Saakashvili's bumpy ride in politics: From chewing his tie to climbing on rooftop
Mikhail Saakashvili's bumpy ride in politics: From chewing his tie to climbing on rooftop
European Court of Human Rights: Promoting filth and insolence
European Court of Human Rights: Promoting filth and insolence
Russian athletes announce their decision about 2018 Winter Olympic Games
Turkish President Erdogan issues ultimatum to Washington and Brussels
Gorbachev names reason behind crisis in US-Russian relations
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision
Human Rights Day: Let us hang our heads in shame
Human Rights Day: Let us hang our heads in shame
Human Rights Day: Let us hang our heads in shame
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision
Putin makes first comment on Trump's Jerusalem decision