Source Pravda.Ru

Lithuania's Respublika Editor Receives Letter With Unidentified Powder

The editor of the Lithuanian newspaper Respublika has received a letter containing an unidentified yellowish powder. Respublika reported the incident on Tuesday. After the powder was proved not radioactive, the envelope was sent in a special container to a bacteriological laboratory. Ever since the terrorist attacks in the USA, Lithuania has received many false reports of coming explosions at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, in the country's largest Lietuva hotel and in other facilities. A draft law has been submitted to the Lithuanian parliament to tighten criminal responsibility for false reports of allegedly mined buildings and for the spread of radioactive, dangerous chemical and bacterial substances.

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