Source AP ©

Bhutto was warned that she may be killed

Former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto announced that she had been warned that suicide squads may kill her upon returning to Pakistan, and that there were two attackers in the bombing that killed over 130.

She said telephone numbers of suicide squads had been given to her by a "brotherly" country and she alerted Gen. Pervez Musharraf in a letter dated Oct. 16. She said one squad was pro-Taliban, the other linked to al-Qaida.

Bhutto said the next attack against her would target her homes in Karachi and her hometown of Larkana, using attackers posing as supporters of a rival political faction.

She said she was confident the government would take measures to prevent it but noted it was suspicious that streetlights failed after sunset Thursday when her convoy was inching its way through the streets of Karachi.

"I'm not accusing the government but certain individuals who abuse their positions and powers," she said.

She blamed the attack on militants trying to quash democratic reforms.

"A minority wants to hijack the destiny of this great nation, and we will not be intimidated by this minority," she told reporters at her Karachi house. "This is a battle for democracy. We wish it to be peaceful. We wish it to be political, which is why, my party and I ... have entered into political negotiations with Gen. Musharraf's regime."

Comments
Russia's game in Libya
US midterm elections: Impeachment unlikely, Russophobia getting stronger
Capital outflow from Russia sets new records
Russian PM threatens not to go to World Economic Forum in Davos
Russian PM threatens not to go to World Economic Forum in Davos
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Presidential and midterm elections in the USA change the 'American project' entirely
Russian scientists develop technology to create HIV resistant human embryos
Russia rips its economy apart with help from the West
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Russia close to recognising Donetsk and Luhansk republics after Donbass elections
Moving inexorably towards war
Russia rips its economy apart with help from the West
Austria will not ruin its friendship with Russia despite spy scandal
World War I: Remembering the fallen, and the war criminals
Norwegians complain of demoralised NATO soldiers
Russia rips its economy apart with help from the West
MP suggests replacing Lenin's mummy with rubber figure
Austria will not ruin its friendship with Russia despite spy scandal
Russia rips its economy apart with help from the West