Source AP ©

US Embassy spy to return to Greece after serving 14-year jail term

Greece's Justice Ministry said Friday that a former U.S. Embassy employee convicted of spying for Greece would return to Athens to serve the remainder of his parole.

Steven Lalas, 54, was sentenced in 1993 to 14 years in prison for spying, and was placed on parole following his release from a U.S. federal prison.

Lalas, a communications officer who is of Greek descent, had served in U.S. government posts in Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia.

Lalas is due to arrive in Greece on Sunday, to be reunited with his wife and children, the Justice Ministry said.

"Justice Minister Sotiris Hadjigakis has provided written assurances to the competent U.S. authorities, that the Greek government will fulfill any court decision regarding Mr. Lalas' parole," a statement said.

It said his parole officially expires on July 8, 2010.

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