Source Pravda.Ru

Leader of Supreme Council of Iraqi Islamic Revolution arrives in Kerbela

Mohammed Bakr Hakim, leader of the Supreme Council of the Iraqi Islamic Revolution (SCIIR) arrived in the Iraqi city of Kerbela where he was warmly welcomed by locals.

According to the information provided to RIA Novosti on Saturday in the SCIIR headquarters, "after Hakim's return from Iran where he had spent 22 years in exile the leader of the Shiite party already visited An-Najaf and Baghdad." Iraqi cities with predominantly Shiite population approvingly received the return home of the famous Iraqi politician and theologian.

Hakim has spoke out in favour of withdrawal of occupation forces from the Iraqi territory, formation of a popular government made of representatives of all religious and national groups as soon as possible and in favour of enhancing the UN role in the process of crisis settlement and the country's reconstruction.

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