Source Pravda.Ru

Entry of Estonia into EU will not affect customs procedure on Russian-Estonian border

There will be no significant changes to the customs procedure on the Russian-Estonian border after Estonia's entry into the EU. As a Rosbalt correspondent reports, this was announced by Head of the Russian Customs Committee Mikhail Vanin, who arrived in Tallinn on an official visit yesterday.

He pointed out that relations with Finland had actually improved and become more open since Finland entered the EU. 'We do not intend to make the customs procedure more difficult on the Russian-Estonian border,' said Mr Vanin. 'We will trust each other more and we will welcome Estonian goods as, hopefully, Estonia will welcome Russian goods.'

'We want our visit to Tallinn to bring about faster and simpler customs regulations on the border as well as a reduction in the number of forms that have to be filled in,' Mr Vanin stressed.

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