Source AP ©

Italian transport workers strike demanding more investment

General transport strike in Italy disrupted train operation and cancelled flights, private cars packed the streets. The workers demand more investment in the sector.

National carrier Alitalia scrapped 217 national and international flights before a four-hour walkout by air sector workers, which began at 11 a.m. (1000 GMT).

Air One, Italy's No. 2 carrier, said only nine flights would be guaranteed during the protest. The strike also affected foreign airlines, with British Airways canceling at least 16 flights.

Transport workers are protesting the scarcity of funds in the new budget as well as the declining fortunes of the main companies in the sector, starting with money-losing Alitalia, which the Italian government is struggling to sell.

Railway company Trenitalia canceled hundreds of trains and warned of further delays as rail workers walked off their jobs at 9 a.m. (0800 GMT) for an eight-hour protest.

Many travelers who did reach Rome's central station had to lug suitcases on foot as the subway shut down and more than 70 percent of the capital's buses remained idle.

Local transportation walkouts were scheduled to last for eight hours at different times in cities across Italy, and with cabs at a premium many commuters tried to reach work in their own cars.

Ship departures were delayed by 24 hours, while highway assistance services and funerary transport workers also joined walkouts.

The city of Rome avoided further chaos by closing a late-night deal Thursday with taxi drivers who for two days staged wildcat strikes and traffic blockages to protest plans by city officials to grant 500 new licenses. The city did not go back on its plans but agreed to discuss with unions how and when the new licenses will be released.

In an exclusive interview with Pravda.Ru, US filmmaker talks to Edu Montesanti on the presidential elections in the Caribbean country, and its importance to Latin America. "The left will come back in Latin America, more likely sooner than later," says Oliver Stone

Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election

In an exclusive interview with Pravda.Ru, US filmmaker talks to Edu Montesanti on the presidential elections in the Caribbean country, and its importance to Latin America. "The left will come back in Latin America, more likely sooner than later," says Oliver Stone

Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election
Comments
The ayatollahs now fear the collapse of the Iranian economy
12 signs of imminent war between the West and Russia
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
12 signs of imminent war between the West and Russia
Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election
Russia will not be the only country to use Crimean Bridge
Kremlin wants foreign invaders out of Syria
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
Germany responds to USA's ultimatum about Nord Stream 2 project
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
Russians massively break traffic rules on Crimea Bridge
International study indicates ways to mitigate the effects of climate change on agriculture
12 signs of imminent war between the West and Russia
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
12 signs of imminent war between the West and Russia
12 signs of imminent war between the West and Russia
Argentina suggests Putin should reinstate gay propaganda for World Cup 2018
International study indicates ways to mitigate the effects of climate change on agriculture