Source Pravda.Ru

Georgia-Abkhazia Conflict Must Be Settled before Georgia-Armenia Railway Line across Abkhazia Reopens

Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze announced on Monday, January 20, that his 'Armenian friends' had spoken to him several times about reopening the railway line across Abkhazia, which has been out of use since 1992-1993 as a result of military action.

In an interview with national radio Mr Shevardnadze said that he had spoken to many of those interested in the reopening of the line and had asked them to help find a peaceful settlement to the Georgia-Abkhazia conflict as this would mean that the railway line and the roads between the two countries could be reopened. Mr Shevardnadze added that he is in favour of the railway line across Abkhazia but insists that this will not be possible unless refugees gradually begin to return to their homes. The president has also demanded that the Adler-Sukhumi railway line, which was reopened in December 2002 without Tbilisi's authorization, be closed.

Comments
Putin dislikes the idea of US army bases coming to Kuril Islands
Russians lose faith in their future, get ready for worse
Capital outflow from Russia sets new records
Malaysia complains of faulty Russian Sukhoi Su-30 fighter jets
Putin dislikes the idea of US army bases coming to Kuril Islands
Men's presence in maternity wards during childbirth considered shameful in Russia
Macron challenges Trump. French independence and croissants at stake
Russia’s sanctions against Ukraine send message to Washington
Russia sells arms to Asia to maintain peace in the world
The Amazon and the New Conquistadores
Putin's three days in Singapore mark Russia's major geopolitical changes since 2000
Castro sued over alleged torture
Macron challenges Trump. French independence and croissants at stake
Castro sued over alleged torture
Malaysia complains of faulty Russian Sukhoi Su-30 fighter jets
Castro sued over alleged torture
Castro sued over alleged torture
Putin dislikes the idea of US army bases coming to Kuril Islands
Castro sued over alleged torture
Putin's three days in Singapore mark Russia's major geopolitical changes since 2000
Putin's three days in Singapore mark Russia's major geopolitical changes since 2000