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Carol Moseley Braun for president

Is the United States ready for a black woman president? Carol Moseley Braun is more than ready to test that question when she entered race for the democratic contender of current republican president George W Bush. Braun's jump to the White House was spurred by the war against Iraq, which she opposed, but the former senator for Illinois has many more points to make.

Born the daughter of a musical law enforcement officer who spoke several languages while her mother worked as a medical technician Braun claims that her parents stimulated her to pursue excellence, embrace opportunity and follow her dreams. Next stop on this road should be the White House. Earlier in her career Braun was senator for the state of Illinois and till recently ambassador for the United States in New Zealand among other things like stepping into her father's footsteps as Assistant United States Attorney.

For a former ambassador this candidate does not look much to the outside world. In her campaign, outside Iraq, the world doesn’t seem to exist. She focuses on education. Carol Moseley Braun stands for better education and more equal opportunities for all American children. This is close to her work for the Clinton administration, where when she was defeated as Senator in a reelection worked as special consultant to the Department of Education. In here campaign Braun focuses on the rights for woman, disabled and civil rights. On her website she only speaks of Iraq. In which Braun supports the troops, but is against the war. "I didn't think it had anything to do with the war on terrorism. I've called it a misadventure. So we shouldn't be there, in my opinion. But having been - now that we're there, we've got young men and women in the field. We cannot abandon them. We have to give them the support they need to get the job finished. Americans do not cut and run", Braun spoke out on CNN. A view of the rest of the world is not to be found, but George W. Bush did not have a view when he was elected president. Braun rarely speaks out on foreign policy. In a Washington Post interview she commented that the current policy has damaged the relations with friends and allies, and speaks out for partnerships and against the "folly of the preemptive war". A more extensive view on relations with Europe, Russia or other parts of the world is not given, but on the whole it seems a candidate who favors working together with other countries instead of confrontation.

Carol Moseley Braun is an experienced politician, but seems in her campaign to focus on her being a woman and being black. She speaks out for moral issues and restoring human rights. She is an opponent of the death penalty, and genuinely wants to help the poor Americans. "I am running for the Democratic nomination because I believe this party ought to stand for inclusion, hope, and new ways to resolve old problems", she told the public at Howard University in Washington DC when she announced that she was running for president. "Breaking barriers; building bridges; bringing people together: I have been blessed to be an agent for change and progress, but I cannot take full personal credit for these accomplishments. I have always depended on the help and support of people of good will who had the vision to imagine the possibilities borne of giving me a chance to contribute. I tell the people what I believe in, I keep my promises and I hold myself accountable for my service. My entire public life has been characterized by problem solving with new ideas that are as practical as they are innovative. I want to bring my skills and my experience to bear on healing our country, and creating a renaissance for America. Through partnerships for peace and prosperity and progress we will renew the American dream of freedom and opportunity."

Carol Moseley Braun is fighting an uphill battle. She does not have the financial resources of other democratic candidates and by being outspoken on being a black and female candidate also alienates a large group of voters. Perhaps this candidate is progressive for this day and age. But making a good run, she can prove that a progressive black female president can be a possibility in the near future.    

 

Richard Wagenaar

Pravda.Ru