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Timothy Bancroft-Hinchey replies to Mike's "I have had enough"

Dear Mike, I read your letter "I have had enough” with interest and I think you express the desperation of many millions of people who were born into the capitalist-monetarist world very ably.

In the capitalist-monetarist model, real power is detained by a few colourless and invisible elements who pull the strings behind the throne. The Prime Minister or President and his government are a sort of front for these elements to hide behind. What do they do?

First, they control each and every avenue towards power and this starts with the capital of the country, in monetary and human terms. Therefore every blockage is set in place to prevent a person from becoming powerful and thereby challenging the system which these elements have decided is the best one, for them.

It starts with the education system. After years and years of study, between 20 and 40% of people in the western world leave school illiterate or functionally illiterate, meaning that they understand the letters but not a text. Drama number two is getting a job, as you point out in your letter. Drama number three is retaining the job. Drama number four is buying a house, which is increasingly impossible in the UK, where I believe 12% of first-time buyers are over 40 years of age. The system has you by the throat, you have to take out a massive loan which controls your movements until you are too old to act. It is called a mortgage. In French, "mort" means "death".

Drama number five is retaining the house. Drama number six is whether you have enough money to have children, for the cycle to be repeated. Drama number seven is when you need dental care. Drama number eight is when you need health care. As you know, the system only works when you pay for it.

Eight basic and fundamental dramas from the moment you are born to the second you die and even then the state has the last laugh, pilfering your last haґpennies and putting the family through funeral costs of between one and five thousand pounds. It's kind of like a raspberry from the system as people go to meet their Maker.

Under the Communist model, of course, none of this is true, thankfully. Using the Soviet Union as an example, the education system was free and a temple of excellence, meaning that today any adult in the former USSR is able to compete with any other individual anywhere on Earth for any job at any time.

The health care system was free and of the highest quality, a job was a birthright, a house was a birthright, food was a birthright, alcohol for moderate consumption was a birthright, a pension was a birthright. For all its "ills" the economy in Soviet times produced a GDP which was two times what it is now in the Russian Federation.

I do not consider this system a failure, I do not consider this system as evil. I consider that it is too perfect a system in Marx's model for an imperfect specimen, Mankind. Therefore I believe that Marx and Engels were academics who put a good idea onto paper, Lenin being the one who tried to put it into practice and unfortunately he died before he had time.

Do not forget the considerable blocks that the capitalist world put in the way: the Russian Civil War and a myriad of attempts to subvert the fledgling Soviet governments, just as the USA did everything possible, including assassination attempts, to destroy Cuba, as indeed it did with Brazil (the cotton industry in the State of Ceara, for example).

I believe that the Communist model needs some minor alterations, to introduce for instance a component which rewards labour but the basic idea is valid and in my opinion will therefore be the model of a civilised and developed human society, one which bases its attitude on dialogue, debate and discussion and not war, cruelty and subversion.

The Communists of today are the guardians of the truth which will form tomorrow's society.

Timothy BANCROFT-HINCHEY