Russia » Politics

Elections' epilogue

In the beginning of Putin's first term at power, sinks “Kursk”; in the beginning of Putin's second term, terrible fire consumes historic building in downtown Moscow. Coincidence or a bad sign?

We want to believe that our President is not superstitious and wouldn't regard yesterday's collapse of the unique cultural monument as a bad sign. After all, he needs to justify the high percentage of people's trust. The percentage was high indeed. The notorious administrative resource has fulfilled its mission by luring Russians to cast their votes for the right candidate. However, it was this particular resource that voted.

Even if we are to assume that Putin's real rating is 60% instead of 71,2% (after the examination of 98% of ballots), the number still exceeds that of all the candidates. The fact remains undisputable: there exists no alternative to today's president. And the ones who have been building today’s political structure are to blame for this. Neither one of the existing oppositions was capable enough to bring up a worthy individual.

There used to be Yavlinsky at the right wing. However his time has long elapsed. Then Glasyev sparked at the left wing. However his radical mentality (one of his promises was to make all Russians rich in one year), was similar to Gaidar's shock therapy. People, who had a lot to experience in all these years, simply got scared. Putin, in turn, is associated with stability, even though he isn’t the one to be thanked for all this (high oil prices became some sort of a security deposit for the relative prosperity). People do not care much though. They will be happy if things will improve; otherwise, they will manage to survive…

Kremlin cannot simply stand motionless and merely observe. The country needs reforms. Otherwise, stability will collapse…along with the President. Nearly 30% of voters are not satisfied with the existing system. This is a signal that should not be ignored. Putin has a unique chance; all political and economic controls are all in his hands. Will he use them? If yes, how will it affect the nation at large?

Will Kremlin merely patch up the holes in the country's economics and reassemble governmental authority in the course of the upcoming four years? It would be nice to believe that Kremlin has already created some sort of a model entitled “controlled democracy” and economic market has already been changed to state capitalism. Right now, this is of utmost importance. Will see what happens afterward.

To discuss the outcome of Russian elections at PRAVDA Forum, go to http://engforum.pravda.ru/showthread.php3?threadid=66213

 

 

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