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Maternal mortality is on the rise in Russia

In Russia maternal mortality is three times greater than in any other Western country.

Only every tenth women of childbearing age can be considered absolutely healthy. Government in turn does not assign necessary means to stimulate further development of various programs aimed specifically at improving the existing demographical situation, reports newspaper “Novie Izvestiya”.

Medics notice another significant problem among women these days—barrenness. Today, every sixth woman in Russia is unable to conceive due to various reasons. There is a total of nearly 6 million of such women. Considering the situation, there exist no more than a hundred specialized medical facilities that are capable of help.

According to the newspaper, on average, each family has to spend no less than $5 000 USD for therapy. That is why financial aspect in gynecology appears to be the most problematic. Today, our country needs nearly 100 billion rubles per year to solve the problem, whereas in reality no more than 10 million in being assigned by the government.

Also, experts note that more children are born with birth defects, pathologies and serious chronic illnesses these days. More young families tend to postpone the birth of their first-born.

Majority of women in Russia give birth after 30, when both mother and her child are at higher risk of facing complications. Early pregnancies often end up in abortions. As a result, nearly 10% of women will never be able to conceive again. Abortions remain number one cause of female mortality, concludes the newspaper.

In general, in 2003 Russian population (within RF) has decreased by 0,5% (767,6 people) in comparison to 2002. According to the State Committee of Statistics, total number of permanent residents inhabiting the Russian Federation has equaled to 144,2 million people (as of Dec 1 2003). Experts claim that while taking into account present-day birth rate, Russian population could in fact decrease to 1, 170 million people by 2300.