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Russian provincials applied for visas to enter Moscow

On the eve of April Fools, several residents of city Veliky Novgorod requested the city Passport and Visa Department grant them … visas for entering Moscow.
This request was caused by one of Novgorod newspapers which had written about introducing new regulations for entering Moscow for residents of Russian regions. The newspaper wrote that all non-Muscovites, except for the residents of Moscow and Kaliningrad regions, were required to have special visas for entering Russian capital.

In fact, this was a joke on the eve of “April Fools Day”, but the police and the people applied for visas believe this was a bad joke. Meanwhile, the newspaper reporters said they had written on the last page of their weekly newspaper in small font that some of the stories were jokes on the eve of April Fools.

Meanwhile, the survey of 1600 Russians conducted by Russian Analytical revealed that 46 percent of respondents often have reasons to laugh, 35 percent laugh from time to time, 18 percent rarely laugh. 
The most good-humored people are students, housewives and people younger than 40 years old, wealthy and single.

Not working pensioners, unemployed, women older than 55 years old, people with low income and low level of education, divorced, tend to laugh very seldom.

More than one third of the survey participants (35 percent) said that they never took offence about the jokes of their relatives and friends. They are mostly men aged 25-40.

Women, people younger than 25 years old and people with low income most often take offence to jokes.
76 percent of the surveyed said that they are ready to laugh at themselves.

Source: Information agencies

 


Several residents of city Veliky Novgorod requested the city Passport and Visa Department grant them … visas for entering Moscow.
This request was caused by one of Novgorod newspapers which had written about introducing new regulations for entering Moscow for residents of Russian regions. The newspaper wrote that all non-Muscovites, except for the residents of Moscow and Kaliningrad regions, were required to have special visas for entering Russian capital.

In fact, this was a joke on the eve of “April Fools Day”, but the police and the people applied for visas believe this was a bad joke. Meanwhile, the newspaper reporters said they had written on the last page of their weekly newspaper in small font that some of the stories were jokes on the eve of April Fools.

Meanwhile, the survey of 1600 Russians conducted by Russian Analytical revealed that 46 percent of respondents often have reasons to laugh, 35 percent laugh from time to time, 18 percent rarely laugh. 
The most good-humored people are students, housewives and people younger than 40 years old, wealthy and single.

Not working pensioners, unemployed, women older than 55 years old, people with low income and low level of education, divorced, tend to laugh very seldom.

More than one third of the survey participants (35 percent) said that they never took offence about the jokes of their relatives and friends. They are mostly men aged 25-40.

Women, people younger than 25 years old and people with low income most often take offence to jokes.
76 percent of the surveyed said that they are ready to laugh at themselves.

Source: Information agencies