Society » Real life stories

Miss Universe propagates positive philosophy

Miss Universe 2005Russian-born Miss Universe Natalya Glebova wants to fight AIDS

Russian Natalya Nikolayeva, 18, has failed to be one of the 10 top beauties at the Miss Universe contest in Bangkok. However, Natalya Glebova from Canada who became Miss Universe this year is a Russian by birth. 

Parents of the 2005 Miss Universe used to be ordinary people before they left the native town of Tuapse in Russia’s south for Toronto, Canada. The girl was 12 when her parents brought her to Canada. Natalya remembers her childhood in Tuapse perfectly well; she remembers that she is Russian by birth. Today, her life seriously differs from the life she had in Russia. “I fell in love with Toronto as soon as we came here. When we came here 11 years ago we had nothing, and today our life is very good here,” Natalya says.
    
Natasha Glebova is the most beautiful girl in the Universe - photo gallery

The 2005 Miss Universe says she sticks to positive thinking no matter what is going on. It is not ruled out that this positive philosophy together with the beauty and charm of the blue-eyed brunette of Russian origin explain her success at the contest.

Natalya is a show-girl. At the same time, she studies information technologies at the university in Toronto. She also plays the piano and loves to compose music. Active sports – cycling, roller skates, swimming, eurhythmics and yoga help her be in good form. Natalya Glebova says her mission of the Miss Universe will be propaganda of fighting AIDS and collection of money for finding a treatment for the terrible disease.

It was in 1952 that the title of Miss Universe was awarded for the first time; a girl from Finland won it. American girls won the title seven times. Puerto-Rico and Venezuela became the winner four times each. Oksana Fyodorova from Russia won the title in 2002, but failed to retain the title and it proceeded to a Panamanian girl.

In an exclusive interview with Pravda.Ru, US filmmaker talks to Edu Montesanti on the presidential elections in the Caribbean country, and its importance to Latin America. "The left will come back in Latin America, more likely sooner than later," says Oliver Stone

Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election

In an exclusive interview with Pravda.Ru, US filmmaker talks to Edu Montesanti on the presidential elections in the Caribbean country, and its importance to Latin America. "The left will come back in Latin America, more likely sooner than later," says Oliver Stone

Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election
Comments
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
Foreign Ministry official explains why Russia had to sell Alaska to US
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Russia will not be the only country to use Crimean Bridge
The Royal Wedding and the Silly Season
Kremlin wants foreign invaders out of Syria
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Venezuela may expect another Panama scenario from 1989
Foreign Ministry official explains why Russia had to sell Alaska to US
Foreign Ministry official explains why Russia had to sell Alaska to US
Russians massively break traffic rules on Crimea Bridge
Exclusive Interview: Oliver Stone on Venezuelan Election
Foreign Ministry official explains why Russia had to sell Alaska to US
Trump sows death in Gaza Strip as US to celebrate opening embassy in Jerusalem
UK cracks down on 'dirty Russian money'
Draft Dodger in Chief Dodges "Historic" Opening of US Embassy, Jerusalem.