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Turkish motor ship crashes into Crimean bridge


A Turkish dry cargo ship clashed on 19 March with piers of the Crimean bridge, which is currently under construction in the Kerch Strait.
"On 19 March at 23.25 the 'Lira' motor vessel under the flag of Panama, which belongs to the Turkish Turkuaz Shipping Corp company, veered from the recommended course and collided with the constructive elements of the bridge," a source at the Crimean Bridge infocentre said.
Collision with the vessel destroyed a pier № 80, while two neighbouring piers were damaged.
According to the experts, "substitution of piers will not affect the completion terms of the technological bridge". Members of the vessel crew, that comprise 9 people, were not injured. The dry cargo ship is currently in roadstead at the Taganrog port.

Pravda.Ru

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