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American press makes ridiculous comments about post Soviet states

After the so-called “Orange revolution” in Ukraine, there've been rumors about the possibility of the same sort of events taking place in other post Soviet states, which up until now haven't had a chance to get accustomed to “freedom and democracy”.

There is an entire array of various comments and forecasts emerging the western media at an incredible pace. At times however, one gets an impression as though many of those so-called “experts” do not possess a slightest clue as to where for instance Kirgizia or Moldavia is located. Then again, many journalists and commentators work in highly-respectful newspapers and magazines; therefore their expertise is never questioned…

Some of the highly respected editions however stand apart from the rest. Take The Wall Street Journal for example with its frequent reports of various events that take place in Russia and throughout the post Soviet states. It is noteworthy to mention that authors of the American newspaper oftentimes tend to exaggerate the subject. Such was the case with the article about possible ways to overthrow “Lukashenko’s dictatorship regime”.

The author of the aforementioned article (who is actually a political editor of the US Congress newspaper The Hill) talks about a convention of “thirty something” Belarusians in Vilnus. Apparently, they belong to a group of people fighting against “Stalin's surreal regime, which had been based upon fear, hunger and ideology, indistinctive of personality-cult.”

It's hard to refrain from quoting several of such ridiculous statements from The Wall Street Journal:

“No matter how painful it is to acknowledge, Belarussians do realize that it is obviously tempting to compare Belarus and Ukraine but at the same time it would be wrong. Belarus lacks… “raw material” for democratic rebellion.”

The phrase about the “raw material” is just fascinating… No comments. Thank you very much for such flattering impression of us.

“Unlike Ukraine, where independent “Channel 5” was constantly fueling up hundreds of thousands of storm-trrops on the Ukrainian Independence square with democratic “heresy”, Belarus lacks authentic “fourth authority”. In addition, (unlike Ukraine) Belarus lacks such vast community of Americans of local origin who had literally flooded the country right after the revolution…; what makes the situation even more difficult is the fact that none of the leaders-reformers comes from political establishment in Belarus, as Yushchenko in Ukraine for instance who used to be a Prime Minister back in the old days.”

Generally speaking, the phrase about “storm-troops” triggers a particular kind of associations, which have nothing to do with Ukraine and Belarus with their democracies. Instead, it gives rise to memories of Germany of early 30's. Regrets about those communities are also quite unclear; after all, is it really a key requirement for the “democratic revolution?” And of course the “establishment”…Who would be able to explain how can a squeaky clean reformer-democrat ever emerge from the “rotten Kuchma's regime?”

“In the meantime, the fact that the United States starts paying attention at Belarus is already a positive factor. Recently, the Congress passed an “act of democracy in Belarus.” Rumor has it that at least one high-ranking member of the Committee…has promised that the Congress plans to provide more money this year to support the opposition. Besides, anyone who’s got a TV set should be aware that Condoleezza Rice has included Belarus in her list of six “bulwarks of tyranny” in the world.”

People, do you ever think before writing this stuff?! The entire article could be easily divided into separate ridiculous quotes. The author is truly an “expert” in the subject of Belarus! Next time though, please do not forget to include some photos of starving people of Belarus on the streets of Minsk, Gomel and Vitebsk. Just to bring to everybody's attention the true essence of the dictator “in a sport suit giving speeches like head of a kolkhoz”.